Tag Archives: art projects

It’s raku time! Let’s go outside and fire up the kilns….

Raku gestookte bal

Raku fired ball. JeroenPascal from the Netherlands via Wikimedia Commons

Jacques Huther during a meeting of raku

Jacques Huther‪ during a raku‬ ‪session‬. Niouz via Wikimedia Commons

Hrnčířské trhy Beroun 2011, raku

Pottery fair in Beroun in 2011, Czech Republic. By Juandev via Wikimedia Commons

Horsehair Vase Judge's Special Award Mashiko 2006 Swanica Ligtenberg

Horsehair Vase Judge’s Special Award Mashiko, 2006. By Swanica Ligtenberg; work and image; via Creative Commons

1 vase boule turquoise

‪Ceramic vase boule, turquoise‬. By Isabelle Milliot (Own work) via Creative Commons

4 japonaise

‪Figure seen in profile, Japanese style. By Isabelle Milliot (Own work) via Wikimedia Commons

Ogata Kenzan - Incense Box in the Shape of a Folding Fan - Walters 491372 - Open

By Ogata Kenzan – Incense Box, 1663-1743. Walters Art Museum via Wikimedia Commons

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Filed under Ancient History, Featured Artists, Fun, Home and Garden, Videos/Photos/Slides

Lark Books 500 series: Artist Call for Entries for new book on beads

Note: I just learned of this notice but still want to pass on the news. If you have completed beads you’d like to submit, there is still time to enter your submission for consideration for Lark Book’s new 500 series book, to be published in 2014. The following comes from the Lark site, source link here:

Deadline! By Craig Sunter from Manchester, UK via Wikimedia Commons

“Showcase 1000 Beads: new Call for Entries with deadline of Feb. 14, 2013!”

January 10, 2013, 12:09 pm  Posted by Ray Hemachandra

“We thank you for sharing this call for entries promptly with all appropriate colleagues, professional groups and associations, message boards, schools, students, and beadmaking communities:

Lark Jewelry & Beading seeks excellent photographs of original, contemporary beads in all materials to publish in a new juried, international collection in our 500 Series of books: Showcase 1000 Beads. This book is scheduled to be published in January 2014. The book will be juried by Kristina Logan.

We welcome and encourage submission of photographs of your handmade beads in all materials (glass, metal, polymer clay, metal clay, ceramics, paper, fiber, plastic, wood, stone, etc.) and design styles. All work must be made no earlier than 2010, and the more recent the work the better—we’d prefer to see your 2012 work over your 2011 work, and your 2011 work over your 2010 work.

We strongly prefer images of beads that have not been published previously, and please do NOT submit images of pieces that have been published in any Lark book. We can accept only high-quality digital images. Artists will receive full acknowledgment within the book and a complimentary copy. Artists retain copyright of their work. There is no entry fee.

All submissions must be submitted electronically through Juried Art Services. Note that there is no fee for using Juried Art Services. The entry page can be found at the following link: http://bit.ly/VTfT6E or, the full URL,  http://www.juriedartservices.com/index.php?content=event_info&event_id=614.

Entries must be submitted by February 14, 2013. We strongly encourage early entries.

All visuals submitted must represent work that is original in design. Please choose work that reflects the book’s concept. A maximum of four entries per artist is allowed, so please submit your best work. An entry may consist of no more than two visuals: an overall shot and one detail (or alternate view); the detail shots are not required. The primary images you submit should each be different designs. For example, do NOT submit four variations of very similar beads; instead, submit one bead from each of four series.

Important: Lark will only publish photos of entries containing images and text that are free of copyright or for which the artist (or approved institution) holds copyright.”

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Book Arts: Writing on Stone(ware)

Monument for the Neolithic Tartaria tables, Tartaria, Romania

Monument for the Neolithic Tărtăria tablets, dated to 5500-5300 BC and discovered in 1961 at Tărtăria, Alba County, Romania by the archaeologist Nicolae Vlassa. The clay tables are associated with the Turdaş-Vinča culture and the Vinča symbols on them predate the proto-Sumerian pictographic script. The monument has been created near the discovery location. By Țetcu Mircea Rareș via Wikimedia Commons

We know the act of writing on clay tablets is an ancient practice. To date, the oldest that have been found are the unearthed at neolithic sites in modern-day Romania and Hungary. The three Tărtăria Tablets have been radio-carbon dated to 5500 BC and are thought to be evidence of proto-writing. For me, today’s post, is exciting to work on…for several reasons. Having been involved with Book Arts since the mid-1980s, it is high time I combined this art form with my favorite medium, clay. (If writing on clay interests you, check out Tom Trusky’s Idaho iPods, about a project based upon Mesopotamian cuneiform tablets.) For today’s post, though, I’d like to first unveil Forrest Snyder’s Ceramic Books, a beautifully designed and enticing site. He creates loose-leaf books which are presented as stacks, hangings, and objects. Pages overlap or drape over shelving and chunky cubes are stacked. Snyder’s pages are adorned with letters, words and images, and the ‘ink’ is a warm brown, which works well with the cream-colored clay. The pages may be stamped or printed; I’m not quite sure how it is done. Print appears on different portions of the page. “My books contain poetry, prose, and related images spanning many pages,” he states on his website. “I try to enhance my thoughts by the choice of materials and methods, the firing resulting in permanent artifacts, and the conditions of their existence – pages change over time,” he continues. These images of his ceramic books are breathtaking and it is such a pleasure to view his slide show. Another approach is shown on Chris Skinner’s Lestaret’s Blog. Here, you’ll find slipcast and slab-built book covers with very fine finish work. Skinner makes rubber moulds of old, embossed books, then replicates them in clay, highlighting textures, print, and designs with stains. The work must be painstaking and the results are

Plantin letterpress

Plantin letterpress type. By France3470 via Wikimedia Commons

perfection. Actually, I have a project I hope to begin working on in the near future: a porcelain book. The idea has been in the back of my mind for about a year and I’ve thought of it while I’ve made other things. I want to roll out thin sheets of porcelain, cut to size (maybe), tear a ‘deckle edge’ (definitely), dry very, very slowly (weighted), write with an underglaze pen, fire, then bind. The idea of writing on clay tablets thrills. The Book Arts field covers much terrain and there are many ideas to explore and projects to create using different clays and techniques. When I gave a workshop on bookbinding several years ago, I made a tiny book and I think I will also want to experiment with tiny clay books. If you would like to begin such projects using clay, too, you have many means available for writing on your ceramic pages. Underglaze pencils, pens, crayons and trailers are among the tools you could use. If you subscribe to Ceramics Daily, read this article by Robin Hopper to learn how to make your own. If you want to write or do detail work with gold, Kemper Tools sells a Gold Pen. The possibilities are endless and timeless.

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Filed under Ancient History, Articles and Interviews, Featured Artists, How-to-do-it, Videos/Photos/Slides

YouTube: How to make a cut tile mosaic with Angelica Pozo

The Ceramic Arts Daily YouTube Channel features many artists and today I’d like to show you one which features ceramic artisan Angelica Pozo. In this video, she teaches us how to make a cut tile mosaic.

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Filed under Featured Artists, Fun, Home and Garden, How-to-do-it, Videos/Photos/Slides