Tag Archives: Ziggurat of Ur

Thank you for visiting Jane Street Clayworks!

Viewership pattern from 11/15 to 12/15, with the most in the United States and Canada and England

When I finally got Google Analytics up and running, I was astounded! I had had no idea that people the world over had seen Jane Street Clayworks. Of course, I know social media has no boundaries, but learning that someone from Tunisia had read my blog was very touching. After I got over the initial excitement, I investigated further using this amazing tool. Then began to feel very grateful. Thank you very much for visiting Jane Street Clayworks, each and every one of you. Your visit is appreciated and I happy you arrived on my doorstep. You are so welcome.

Over time, I have been keenly interested in which articles people have looked at the most and, hands down, the most-read article is “The History of Bricks: Mesopotamia.” In addition, the most viewed photograph also accompanies that article and it is of the famed Ziggurat of Ur. Pauline brought up the idea that teachers might have assigned the article to students. I did put my heart and soul into that series and still believe the humble brick holds the key to civilization, historically.

Search engines sent readers here and it is my sincere wish that you have found what you are looking for with your research or surfing. Using Google Analytics graphics, I want to take the time to show you more about the company you keep here, as I think you’ll find it’s as interesting as I do. When I look at the map above, I see the obvious: most of you are from the United States. I wondered about that, as someone who is writing from Canada, but the U.S. population is gargantuan compared to that of Canada and it makes sense that the readership therefore appears disproportionate. And there are probably more people on the Internet in the U.S. than in any other country in the world. Regarding my country, as I peel back the geographic layers, I see that most of my Canadian readership is from the province in which I live, British Columbia.

Viewership patterns in Canada, with the most readers in British Columbia and Ontario

As it turns out, the U.S. state with the most readers is California, followed by New York. This also means that, all told, most of you are from the West Coast of North America. There could be umpteen reasons why there are so many readers from California, but I do emphasize the Arts and Crafts style and there are bungalows aplenty in The Golden State, along with a healthy appreciation of this historical movement (and its connection to ceramics and pottery). There is a fair spread of readers up and down the state, as you can

Where the majority of this blog's viewers reside, coastal CA

see. Trending toward the coast, save a few spots that are more central. Then we have New York, with a wider geographic spread, but mostly centred in New York City. Much the same with Florida…viewers from all over the state, with the most from the Miami area. Just thinking of Florida makes me pine for the sight of a traditional Florida cottage with its lovely screened sleeping porch, speaking of architectural styles… But while the majority of readers are from California, you are appreciated no matter which country you hail from or which region of said country. I have enjoyed seeing where you are from, especially and I hope you don’t mind my sharing a few locations: Khanty–Mansi Autonomous Okrug, Jakarta, Casablanca, Al Qahirah (or what I know as Cairo), Algeria (this must include my friends there), readers throughout the entire Middle East, Europe, Scandinavia, and, in China, most are from Chongqing.

Yet, whether you are from Southeast Asia, South Asia, Down Under, or anywhere else on the globe, I thank you for coming to Jane Street Clayworks. You are what makes this blog tick and what sustains my interest. Your visit is so appreciated. As an Adult Third Culture Kid, people and places are in my blood…no geographic location seems too far away…. Plus, we all share in the appreciation of ceramics and pottery, it’s history and modern practice.

Leave a Comment

Filed under Articles and Interviews, Current Events, Fun, Videos/Photos/Slides